fbpx
Connect with us

Tech

Advertisements Could Be All Over Your iPhone Soon

Published

on

Advertisements Could Be All Over Your iPhone Soon

Person holding iPhone

Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty

By Rob Rich/Aug. 15, 2022 2:14 pm EDT

Granted, ads aren’t an entirely new concept on Apple devices. Some of your built-in iPhone, iPad, or Mac apps already use them, in fact. From the App Store’s “recommended” search results to banners in Apple News, chances are you’ve encountered a few. Thing is, according to Bloomberg analyst Mark Gurman there’s a good chance we’re going to be seeing a lot more of this kind of thing — whether we want to or not.

As Gurman goes on to point out, having ads (targeted ads, no less) on an expensive, premium device like an iPhone or iPad feels a little disingenuous given Apple’s typical stance on privacy. It is possible to turn off personalized ads, assuming the device’s owner is aware of the option and knows how to access it (go to Settings, Privacy, Apple Advertising), but that only stops the ads from using demographic data. It doesn’t actually prevent the ads from appearing.

What we can expect

Person browsing movies on iPad

22 TREE HOUSE/Shutterstock

Gurman believes that, due to some activity within Apple’s advertising teams and a mention on a recent earnings call, the company will eventually expand its advertising reach into other first-party apps and services. This could mean seeing pop-ups or banners when using the Maps app, as well as finding more sponsored content in other digital Apple stores like Apple Books and Apple Podcasts. Apple could potentially offer publishers the ability to pay to appear at the top of search results (similar to the App Store now), and could result in the appearance of more typical in-app ads.

Expanded tiers for Apple TV+ are also being theorized, which would potentially see the streaming service offer ad-supported and ad-free options similar to what other platforms like Netflix and Disney+ have been doing, though as of now this remains mostly speculative. Apple does seem to have an interest in expanding its potential for advertisements, but we won’t know for sure just yet whether we’ll see a significant increase in advertisements on Apple devices in the near future. 








Go to Source

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Tech

USB logos finally make sense, thanks to a redesign

Published

on

USB logos finally make sense, thanks to a redesign

, Senior Editor

As PCWorld’s senior editor, Mark focuses on Microsoft news and chip technology, among other beats. He has formerly written for PCMag, BYTE, Slashdot, eWEEK, and ReadWrite.

Go to Source

Continue Reading

Tech

Cheaper OLED monitors might be coming soon

Published

on

Cheaper OLED monitors might be coming soon

, Staff Writer

Michael is a former graphic designer who’s been building and tweaking desktop computers for longer than he cares to admit. His interests include folk music, football, science fiction, and salsa verde, in no particular order.

Go to Source

Continue Reading

Tech

NASA Says Hurricane Didn’t Hurt Artemis I Hardware, Sets New Launch Window

Published

on

NASA Says Hurricane Didn’t Hurt Artemis I Hardware, Sets New Launch Window

NASA’s Artemis I moon mission launch, stalled by Hurricane Ian, has a new target for takeoff. The launch window for step one of NASA’s bold plan to return humans to the lunar surface now opens Nov. 12 and closes Nov. 27, the space agency said Friday. 

The news comes after the pending storm caused NASA to scrub the latest Artemis I Iaunch, which had been scheduled for Sunday, Oct. 2. As Hurricane Ian threatened to travel north across Cuba and into Florida, bringing rain and extreme winds to the launch pad’s vicinity, NASA on Monday rolled its monster Space Launch System rocket, and the Orion spacecraft it’ll propel, back indoors to the Vehicle Assembly Building at Florida’s Kennedy Space Center. 

The hurricane made landfall in Florida on Wednesday, bringing with it a catastrophic storm surge, winds and flooding that left dozens of people dead, caused widespread power outages and ripped buildings from their foundations. Hurricane Ian is “likely to rank among the worst in the nation’s history,” US President Joe Biden said on Friday, adding that it will take “months, years, to rebuild.”

Initial inspections Friday to assess potential impacts of the devastating storm to Artemis I flight hardware showed no damage, NASA said. “Facilities are in good shape with only minor water intrusion identified in a few locations,” the agency said in a statement. 

Next up, teams will complete post-storm recovery operations, which will include further inspections and retests of the flight termination system before a more specific launch date can be set. The new November launch window, NASA said, will also give Kennedy employees time to address what their families and homes need post-storm. 

Artemis I is set to send instruments to lunar orbit to gather vital information for Artemis II, a crewed mission targeted for 2024 that will carry astronauts around the moon and hopefully pave the way for Artemis III in 2025. Astronauts on that high-stakes mission will, if all goes according to plan, put boots on the lunar ground, collect samples and study the water ice that’s been confirmed at the moon’s South Pole. 

The hurricane-related Artemis I rollback follows two other launch delays, the first due to an engine problem and the second because of a hydrogen leak.

Hurricane Ian has been downgraded to a post-tropical cyclone but is still bringing heavy rains and gusty winds to the Mid-Atlantic region and the New England coast.

Go to Source

Continue Reading
Home | Latest News | Tech | Advertisements Could Be All Over Your iPhone Soon
a

Market

Trending