fbpx
Connect with us

Tech

Arm sues Qualcomm over Nuvia tie-up

Published

on

Arm sues Qualcomm over Nuvia tie-up

Qualcomm hopes to integrate Nuvia’s technology into its system-on-a-chip products based on Arm cores – but Arm says this infringes its IP

Cliff Saran

By

Published: 01 Sep 2022 9:18

Arm has filed a lawsuit against Qualcomm and Nuvia for breach of licence agreements and trademark infringement. The chipmaker filed the lawsuit against Qualcomm and two of its subsidiaries in the US District Court for the District of Delaware. 

In a statement about the lawsuit, the company’s officials said: “Arm is filing this claim to protect Arm, our partners, and the unparalleled ecosystem we have built together. Arm and its partners have invested billions of dollars to create industry-leading intellectual property.

“Because Qualcomm attempted to transfer Nuvia licences without Arm’s consent, which is a standard restriction under Arm’s licence agreements, Nuvia’s licences terminated in March 2022. Before and after that date, Arm made multiple good faith efforts to seek a resolution. In contrast, Qualcomm has breached the terms of the Arm licence agreement by continuing development under the terminated licences. Arm was left with no choice other than to bring this claim against Qualcomm and Nuvia to protect our IP, our business, and to ensure customers are able to access valid Arm-based products.”

Arm’s business model is based on licensing chip designs to chip manufacturers, who are able to integrate the technology into their own designs, such as system-on-a-chip semiconductors. “Arm takes pride in our role as innovator of the world’s most critical semiconductor IP and the billions of devices that run on Arm,” a spokesperson for Arm added.

“These technological achievements have required years of research and significant costs and should be recognised and respected. As an intellectual property company, it is incumbent upon us to protect our rights and the rights of our ecosystem. We will work vigorously to protect what is rightfully ours and we are confident that the courts will agree with us.”

Earlier this year, Qualcomm announced plans to acquire Nuvia for $1.4bn. At the time, Qualcomm said it expected Nuvia CPUs would be integrated across Qualcomm Technologies’ portfolio of products, powering smartphones, laptops, network equipment, digital cockpits and advanced driver assistance systems.

At the time, Jim Thompson, chief technology officer of Qualcomm, said: “Creating high-performance, low-power processors and highly integrated, complex SoCs are part of our DNA. Adding Nuvia’s deep understanding of high-performance design and integrating Nuvia CPUs with Snapdragon – together with our industry-leading graphics and AI – will take computing performance to a new level and drive new capabilities for products that serve multiple industries.”

According to some news reports on the internet, Arm’s lawsuit is being seen as an attempt by the chipmaker to derail the Qualcomm/Nuvia deal.

Earlier this year, Qualcomm CEO Cristiano Amon told the FT that the company wanted to buy a stake in Arm in order to maintain its independence. “We are an interested party,” he said. “It’s a very important asset and it’s an asset which is going to be essential for the development of our industry.”





Read more on Chips and processor hardware

Go to Source

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Tech

USB logos finally make sense, thanks to a redesign

Published

on

USB logos finally make sense, thanks to a redesign

, Senior Editor

As PCWorld’s senior editor, Mark focuses on Microsoft news and chip technology, among other beats. He has formerly written for PCMag, BYTE, Slashdot, eWEEK, and ReadWrite.

Go to Source

Continue Reading

Tech

Cheaper OLED monitors might be coming soon

Published

on

Cheaper OLED monitors might be coming soon

, Staff Writer

Michael is a former graphic designer who’s been building and tweaking desktop computers for longer than he cares to admit. His interests include folk music, football, science fiction, and salsa verde, in no particular order.

Go to Source

Continue Reading

Tech

NASA Says Hurricane Didn’t Hurt Artemis I Hardware, Sets New Launch Window

Published

on

NASA Says Hurricane Didn’t Hurt Artemis I Hardware, Sets New Launch Window

NASA’s Artemis I moon mission launch, stalled by Hurricane Ian, has a new target for takeoff. The launch window for step one of NASA’s bold plan to return humans to the lunar surface now opens Nov. 12 and closes Nov. 27, the space agency said Friday. 

The news comes after the pending storm caused NASA to scrub the latest Artemis I Iaunch, which had been scheduled for Sunday, Oct. 2. As Hurricane Ian threatened to travel north across Cuba and into Florida, bringing rain and extreme winds to the launch pad’s vicinity, NASA on Monday rolled its monster Space Launch System rocket, and the Orion spacecraft it’ll propel, back indoors to the Vehicle Assembly Building at Florida’s Kennedy Space Center. 

The hurricane made landfall in Florida on Wednesday, bringing with it a catastrophic storm surge, winds and flooding that left dozens of people dead, caused widespread power outages and ripped buildings from their foundations. Hurricane Ian is “likely to rank among the worst in the nation’s history,” US President Joe Biden said on Friday, adding that it will take “months, years, to rebuild.”

Initial inspections Friday to assess potential impacts of the devastating storm to Artemis I flight hardware showed no damage, NASA said. “Facilities are in good shape with only minor water intrusion identified in a few locations,” the agency said in a statement. 

Next up, teams will complete post-storm recovery operations, which will include further inspections and retests of the flight termination system before a more specific launch date can be set. The new November launch window, NASA said, will also give Kennedy employees time to address what their families and homes need post-storm. 

Artemis I is set to send instruments to lunar orbit to gather vital information for Artemis II, a crewed mission targeted for 2024 that will carry astronauts around the moon and hopefully pave the way for Artemis III in 2025. Astronauts on that high-stakes mission will, if all goes according to plan, put boots on the lunar ground, collect samples and study the water ice that’s been confirmed at the moon’s South Pole. 

The hurricane-related Artemis I rollback follows two other launch delays, the first due to an engine problem and the second because of a hydrogen leak.

Hurricane Ian has been downgraded to a post-tropical cyclone but is still bringing heavy rains and gusty winds to the Mid-Atlantic region and the New England coast.

Go to Source

Continue Reading
Home | Latest News | Tech | Arm sues Qualcomm over Nuvia tie-up
a

Market

Trending