fbpx
Connect with us

Tech

Can Your Samsung Galaxy Get A Virus From Chrome? Here’s What We Know

Published

on

Can Your Samsung Galaxy Get A Virus From Chrome? Here’s What We Know

Samsung Galaxy S22

Framesira/Shutterstock

Most Samsung Galaxy smartphones come with Google Chrome or Samsung Internet as the default browser. Unlike the Safari app, the default browser on iOS, the pre-installed browsers on your Android smartphone are more vulnerable to security infiltration. Google Chrome, the most popular mobile browser, is no exception. Besides the security weakness, we’ve identified other issues with Google Chrome related to performance, privacy, and settings bloat.

However, Samsung Galaxy smartphones are equipped with security features to protect against malware. Before you download any files via a browser or Play Store, they’re first scanned for viruses. Similarly, you can choose “Enhanced protection” on Google Chrome to prevent downloading files and extensions with malware. Even so, Android devices have the highest rate of malware compared to Windows, IoT, and iPhones — as reported by Panda Security. Of course, you should be concerned if your Samsung Galaxy can get a virus from Google Chrome. So, let’s find out more. 

Your Samsung Galaxy can get a virus from Google Chrome

Google Chrome logo on Samsung S8

dennizn/Shutterstock

It’s possible to get malware on your Samsung Galaxy from Google Chrome if you visit malicious websites or download infected files. If your phone is compromised, it could be slower than usual and the battery could even discharge quicker. Other types of malware can hijack your phone’s settings without your approval. What’s even more concerning is that some Android malware can be used by hackers to steal your passwords and private information.

The good news is that your Samsung Galaxy smartphone is designed to automatically detect any malware. However, if you want to run a manual diagnostic, you can go to “Device protection” under “Battery and Device Care” to scan for any threats. Alternatively, you can access “Google Settings” and select “Verify apps” under “Security” to check your Samsung Galaxy for any signs of virus infection. But if your Samsung device runs on Android 6 or below, you can scan for malware using the Smart Manager app.

How to remove a virus on your Samsung Galaxy

Samsung Galaxy smartphone in hand

Framesira/Shutterstock

If you’ve detected any malware on your Samsung Galaxy, your best course of action would be to remove it. As a precaution, you could also follow the procedure to remove malware even if your diagnostics app doesn’t detect a threat but you’ve noticed suspicious activity on your Android phone. One of the most effective ways to remove malware is to restart it in safe mode. To do that, you need to press the volume down button while you’re restarting the phone and then “Safe Mode” should appear. Once you’ve activated “Safe Mode,” you can delete any third-party apps that could be malicious.

In addition to that, you can clear the cache and data on your Google Chrome and Samsung Internet Browser to remove suspected malware that you could have missed. However, if you don’t want to take any chances, you can restore your phone to factory settings after backing up your crucial data. It would also be a good idea to make sure your Samsung Galaxy has the latest antivirus apps to quarantine high-risk files. 








Go to Source

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Tech

USB logos finally make sense, thanks to a redesign

Published

on

USB logos finally make sense, thanks to a redesign

, Senior Editor

As PCWorld’s senior editor, Mark focuses on Microsoft news and chip technology, among other beats. He has formerly written for PCMag, BYTE, Slashdot, eWEEK, and ReadWrite.

Go to Source

Continue Reading

Tech

Cheaper OLED monitors might be coming soon

Published

on

Cheaper OLED monitors might be coming soon

, Staff Writer

Michael is a former graphic designer who’s been building and tweaking desktop computers for longer than he cares to admit. His interests include folk music, football, science fiction, and salsa verde, in no particular order.

Go to Source

Continue Reading

Tech

NASA Says Hurricane Didn’t Hurt Artemis I Hardware, Sets New Launch Window

Published

on

NASA Says Hurricane Didn’t Hurt Artemis I Hardware, Sets New Launch Window

NASA’s Artemis I moon mission launch, stalled by Hurricane Ian, has a new target for takeoff. The launch window for step one of NASA’s bold plan to return humans to the lunar surface now opens Nov. 12 and closes Nov. 27, the space agency said Friday. 

The news comes after the pending storm caused NASA to scrub the latest Artemis I Iaunch, which had been scheduled for Sunday, Oct. 2. As Hurricane Ian threatened to travel north across Cuba and into Florida, bringing rain and extreme winds to the launch pad’s vicinity, NASA on Monday rolled its monster Space Launch System rocket, and the Orion spacecraft it’ll propel, back indoors to the Vehicle Assembly Building at Florida’s Kennedy Space Center. 

The hurricane made landfall in Florida on Wednesday, bringing with it a catastrophic storm surge, winds and flooding that left dozens of people dead, caused widespread power outages and ripped buildings from their foundations. Hurricane Ian is “likely to rank among the worst in the nation’s history,” US President Joe Biden said on Friday, adding that it will take “months, years, to rebuild.”

Initial inspections Friday to assess potential impacts of the devastating storm to Artemis I flight hardware showed no damage, NASA said. “Facilities are in good shape with only minor water intrusion identified in a few locations,” the agency said in a statement. 

Next up, teams will complete post-storm recovery operations, which will include further inspections and retests of the flight termination system before a more specific launch date can be set. The new November launch window, NASA said, will also give Kennedy employees time to address what their families and homes need post-storm. 

Artemis I is set to send instruments to lunar orbit to gather vital information for Artemis II, a crewed mission targeted for 2024 that will carry astronauts around the moon and hopefully pave the way for Artemis III in 2025. Astronauts on that high-stakes mission will, if all goes according to plan, put boots on the lunar ground, collect samples and study the water ice that’s been confirmed at the moon’s South Pole. 

The hurricane-related Artemis I rollback follows two other launch delays, the first due to an engine problem and the second because of a hydrogen leak.

Hurricane Ian has been downgraded to a post-tropical cyclone but is still bringing heavy rains and gusty winds to the Mid-Atlantic region and the New England coast.

Go to Source

Continue Reading
Home | Latest News | Tech | Can Your Samsung Galaxy Get A Virus From Chrome? Here’s What We Know
a

Market

Trending