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Today’s Wordle Answer #423 – August 16, 2022 Solution And Hints

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Today’s Wordle Answer #423 – August 16, 2022 Solution And Hints

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Yesterday we said we weren’t sure whether this week’s Wordle answers will increase or decrease in difficulty. Well, things are starting out pretty mildly — the WordleBot says it took most players 4 tries to figure out today’s answer, plus it only took us three guesses. It’s a little ironic because today’s word means punishment, in one context, but it ended up being easy as pie. We like to preserve our Wordle streak, but it’s even more important to us that you keep yours going. So, read on for some hints to help you crack today’s puzzle, and as always, we’ll reveal the answer in the second section so you can skip on down if you want to.

Today’s word has two vowels — “U” and “E” — in the third and fourth positions, and no repeated consonants. It’s a noun, and the first letter is “G.” Apart from the meaning we mentioned above, it can also describe a thin porridge. If you added –ling at the end of the word, it would become an adjective that qualifies something as extremely exhausting and demanding. Get it? Well done if you have! If not, check below the next image for the solution word.

The word is synonymous with insubstantial

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The answer to today’s Wordle puzzle (#423 – August 16, 2022) is gruel. We’ve supplied some of its definitions, but it also defines something that is insubstantial, inadequate, or unsatisfying. If something is thin gruel, it could literally be a watery mush or pottage, or figuratively something that’s so lacking in substance that it holds no water.

The word gruel has roots in Middle English “grewel,” which means a meal made from beans or lentils, and from Anglo-French “gruel,” which means a coarse meal. It also traces back to Old English “grūt,” which means meal. These origin words mostly track the history of the word gruel in the context of being a porridge meal. Its usage to describe punishment is mostly of British origin from the phrase “to get one’s gruel” (via Merriam-Webster).

Today we started guessing with the word fraud and followed that up with brute, a sequence that eliminated enough letters for us to arrive at “gruel” on the third guess. The WordleBot reported that it would have solved the puzzle in three tries as well, and that’s our cue to give ourselves a well-deserved high-five. We hope this article helps you finish in record time, too.








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