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Why 2023 will usher in a third-party data renaissance

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Why 2023 will usher in a third-party data renaissance

Marketers have been riding a years-long roller coaster regarding new privacy laws and policies governing how they can use data to guide their campaigns and customer relationships. At every turn, they’ve received a constant piece of advice: to avoid disruption in third-party data availability, build first-party data assets. 

While that’s good advice for many marketers, it’s also not enough. For most brands, third-party data is still a fundamental requirement for enriching and scaling the information they use for effective marketing, particularly acquisition efforts. Now, after years of global upheaval within the data and privacy space, marketing teams are uncertain about where and how third-party data fits into their broader data-driven programs as a privacy-first global reality emerges. 

For these marketers, there’s good news. Going into 2023, the same forces that have been driving the emphasis on building first-party data assets are simultaneously pushing third-party data into a renaissance period that will enable teams to meet and exceed their acquisition and retention goals. 

Regulatory changes are driving the third-party data renaissance

Regulatory, platform and consumer shifts are transforming the data landscape for marketers and the future of third-party data in particular.

Marketers have spent the past few years figuring out how to comply with GDPR, CCPA, CPRA and a host of other policies at the state or international level. Now, in the U.S., there is significant progress toward federal privacy legislation in the form of the ADPPA. This push toward heavier regulation surrounding personal data — mainly how it can be acquired and who can use it — has been perhaps the most significant force behind the drive for first-party data acquisition. 

However, marketers would be remiss to think that greater regulation spells disaster for third-party data solutions. Instead, greater regulation means third-party data solutions are poised to become more robust and essential than ever. This is evident in global markets, where heavier regulation has reshaped the third-party data solutions category around compliance, quality and, above all, consumer control and consent. This means the foundation that underpins the third-party data enrichment and modeling available to marketers is becoming more stable and transparent overall. 

The evolution of cookieless solutions and ID proliferation

After years of deadlines and warnings, the cookieless future has yet to materialize, and, for some, Google’s timelines have lost credibility. However, the continued low-level alarm sparked by the foretold deprecation of third-party cookies in Chrome has already moved the third-party data marketplace in a meaningful way — regardless of whether marketers are choosing to implement long-term solutions right now.

What’s evident is that third-party cookies haven’t been delivering the breadth of audience access and understanding marketers require. When the apparent end for cookies came into focus a few years back, future-focused third-party data partners sprang into action on cookieless solutions designed to help brands and agencies maintain visibility across channels and devices. Those solutions are waiting in the wings and being actively implemented by those looking for a competitive edge. The organizations that tap into them sooner rather than later stand to seize an advantage when the third-party cookie finally vanishes altogether. 

Additionally, with the rise of cookieless solutions comes alternative identifiers. Despite headlines surrounding the constant emergence of new identifiers, the progress of these IDs remains unclear. While numerous integrations and tests exist, none have yet achieved significant market traction. 

The only bit of consensus seems to be that marketers and publishers will need to work with a number of such IDs to reach their audiences, and most players across the ecosystem will have little choice but to pursue a strategy of interoperability among identifiers. This need for interoperability is fundamentally reshaping the third-party data landscape, as the prerequisite for success becomes less about replacing the cookie and more about working with partners that can help marketers onboard and connect the dots among their many data sources in an ID-agnostic way.

Short-term challenges yield long-term progress

The current reshuffling of the data landscape is undoubtedly causing disruption within the digital marketing and publishing worlds. Despite that, there’s a third-party data renaissance underway, and it’s based on marketers’ need for better quality, stability and interoperability within the space. 

This renaissance is paving the way for a future in which the power of first-party data can be enriched and scaled by third-party data that is collected and harnessed in compliant and sustainable ways. For marketing teams, that outcome positions campaigns for the best of both worlds at last.

Sponsored by: Eyeota

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Ashley is a professional writer and editor with a strong background in tech and pop culture. She has written for high traffic websites such as Polygon, Kotaku, StarWars.com, and Nerdist. In her off time, she enjoys playing video games, reading science fiction novels, and hanging out with her rescue greyhound.

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Tesla finally delivers its first production Semi

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Tesla finally delivers its first production Semi

Five years after CEO Elon Musk officially unveiled his Semi, Tesla’s electrified tractor trailer, the company delivered its first official production vehicle to Pepsi on Thursday during its “Semi Delivery Event” held at Tesla’s Nevada Gigafactory. The beverage maker has ordered 100 of the vehicles in total.

First shown off in 2017, the Tesla Semi originally was set to retail for $150,000 and $180,000 for the 300- and 500-mile versions, respectively. Those prices are significantly higher than the $60k a standard diesel cab runs but Tesla estimates that its vehicles can operate 20 percent more efficiently (2kWh per mile, Musk revealed Thursday), and save up to $250,000 over the million-mile life of the Semi.

Each rig is “designed like a bullet,” Musk said at the vehicle’s unveiling, and would come equipped with a massive 1MW battery pack. This reportedly offers a 20-second 0-60, which is impressive given that these vehicles are towing up to 80,000 pounds at a time, and a spent-to-80 percent charge time of just 30 minutes. The Semis are also outfitted with Enhanced Autopilot capabilities, as well as jackknife-mitigation systems, blind-spot sensors and data-logging for fleet management.

As reservations opened in 2017, Musk said at the time, deliveries would begin two short years later, in 2019. By April 2020, Tesla had officially pushed that delivery date back to 2021, citing production delays and supply chain issues brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. However, just two months after that, in May of 2020, Musk sent a company-wide email reading, “It’s time to go all out and bring the Tesla Semi to volume production. It’s been in limited production so far, which has allowed us to improve many aspects of the design,” as seen by CNBC. In the same email he confirmed that production would take place in Tesla’s Nevada Gigafactory.

Cut to July, 2021, and the new delivery date has been pushed again, this time to 2022, citing both the ongoing global processor shortage and its own pandemic-limited battery production capability for the new 4680 style cells as contributing factors.

“We believe we remain on track to build our first Model Y vehicles in Berlin and Austin in 2021,” Musk said during the company’s Q2, 2021 investor call. “The pace of the respective production ramps will be influenced by the successful introduction of many new product and manufacturing technologies, ongoing supply-chain-related challenges and regional permitting.”

“To better focus on these factories, and due to the limited availability of battery cells and global supply chain challenges, we have shifted the launch of the Semi truck program to 2022,” he continued. Beginning in May of this year, Tesla started actively taking reservations again for a $20,000 deposit. “And first deliveries are now,” Musk said on Thursday before welcoming Kirk Tanner, CEO PepsiCo Beverages North America, and Steven Williams, CEO PepsiCo Foods North America, on stage for high fives and handshakes.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. All prices are correct at the time of publishing.

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